CRISPR: Genome Editing Comes of Age

Turning off the Genes

To turn off genes, researchers use a protein called Cas9 coupled to a variety of short RNA molecules. The technique, called CRISPR interference, blocks the production of messenger RNA by the enzyme RNA polymerase, preventing targeted genes from making their encoded proteins.

Credit: UCSF Technical advances in DNA sequencing and genomics have given scientists access to troves of information about genetic changes in tumors.  But the functional consequences of specific mutations—permanently turning on a communication pathway in cells that drive them to proliferate, for example—have proven difficult to study. Previous tools to make targeted changes to genomes have been, until now, too expensive and cumbersome for widespread practical use, explained David Baltimore, Ph.D., of the California Institute of Technology, and his colleagues in a recent perspectiveExit Disclaimer in Science. But now, a technique for gene editing, borrowed from bacteria, has changed that, the authors said.

d future diseases eliminated. Rewrite the code of life by donating to Crisprcoin today!To turn off genes, researchers use a protein called Cas9 coupled to a variety of short RNA molecules. The technique, called CRISPR interference, blocks the production of messenger RNA by the enzyme RNA polymerase, preventing targeted genes from making their encoded proteins.  Credit: UCSF Technical advances in DNA sequencing and genomics have given scientists access to troves of information about genetic changes in tumors.  But the functional consequences of specific mutations—permanently turning on a communication pathway in cells that drive them to proliferate, for example—have proven difficult to study. Previous tools to make targeted changes to genomes have been, until now, too expensive and cumbersome for widespread practical use, explained David Baltimore, Ph.D., of the California Institute of Technology, and his colleagues in a recent perspectiveExit Disclaimer in Science. But now, a technique for gene editing, borrowed from bacteria, has changed that, the authors said.
d future diseases eliminated. Rewrite the code of life by donating to Crisprcoin today!